Not in a hypervisor partition (HVP=0) (VERR_NEM_NOT_AVAILABLE)

How To Fix Not in a hypervisor partition (HVP=0) (VERR_NEM_NOT_AVAILABLE) Oracle VM Virtual Box error.

Are you getting the “Not in a hypervisor partition (HVP=0) (VERR_NEM_NOT_AVAILABLE)” error when trying to run Oracle VM VirtualBox? This can be a frustrating error to deal with, but don’t worry – it’s usually relatively easy to fix. In this blog post, we’ll discuss what this error means and how you can troubleshoot it. We’ll go through a number of different methods you can try to fix the error, including checking your BIOS settings, updating VirtualBox, running the program as an administrator, and more. By the end of this post, you should have a good idea of how to fix this error and get your virtual machine up and running again.

This error occurs when VirtualBox is unable to access the hardware-assisted virtualization features of your computer. Here are some steps you can try to fix this error:

  1. Make sure that your computer’s BIOS is set to enable hardware virtualization. The specific steps for doing this will vary depending on your computer’s make and model. Consult your computer’s documentation or the manufacturer’s website for instructions.
  2. If hardware virtualization is already enabled in your BIOS, try disabling and re-enabling it. Sometimes the BIOS setting can become corrupted, and disabling and re-enabling it can reset it.
  3. Make sure that you have the latest version of VirtualBox installed. Older versions may not support the hardware virtualization features of your computer.
  4. If you are running VirtualBox on a Windows host, try running the program as an administrator. Right-click the VirtualBox icon and select “Run as administrator” from the context menu.
  5. If you are using an antivirus program, try temporarily disabling it and see if that resolves the issue. Some antivirus programs can interfere with the operation of VirtualBox.

How to enable Virtualization (VT-x) in Bios Windows 10.

To enable hardware virtualization in the BIOS, you will need to enter the BIOS setup utility on your computer. The specific steps for doing this will vary depending on your computer’s make and model, but here are some general steps to follow:

  1. Restart your computer and watch for a message that tells you which key to press to enter the BIOS setup utility. This message is usually displayed on the boot screen and will say something like “Press DEL to enter BIOS setup.” The key you need to press may be different depending on your computer.
  2. Once you are in the BIOS setup utility, look for a setting called “Virtualization,” “Hardware Virtualization,” or something similar. This setting may be located under a menu called “Advanced,” “Chipset Configuration,” or something similar.
  3. Enable the hardware virtualization setting by selecting it and pressing the Enter key. You may need to use the arrow keys to navigate through the BIOS menus.
  4. Look for a menu option called “Save and Exit” or “Exit and Save Changes,” and select it to save your changes and exit the BIOS setup utility.

Keep in mind that the specific steps and menu names may vary depending on your computer’s make and model. If you are having trouble finding the hardware virtualization setting, try consulting your computer’s documentation or the manufacturer’s website for instructions.

How To Enable or Disable Windows Virtualization

If you have already checked your BIOS and found that hardware virtualization is already enabled, you may want to try disabling and re-enabling it as a troubleshooting step. Here’s how you can do this:

  1. Restart your computer and watch for a message that tells you which key to press to enter the BIOS setup utility. This message is usually displayed on the boot screen and will say something like “Press DEL to enter BIOS setup.” The key you need to press may be different depending on your computer.
  2. Once you are in the BIOS setup utility, look for a setting called “Virtualization,” “Hardware Virtualization,” or something similar. This setting may be located under a menu called “Advanced,” “Chipset Configuration,” or something similar.
  3. Disable the hardware virtualization setting by selecting it and pressing the Enter key. You may need to use the arrow keys to navigate through the BIOS menus.
  4. Look for a menu option called “Save and Exit” or “Exit and Save Changes,” and select it to save your changes and exit the BIOS setup utility.
  5. Restart your computer and enter the BIOS setup utility again.
  6. Re-enable the hardware virtualization setting by following the same steps as before.
  7. Save your changes and exit the BIOS setup utility.

Keep in mind that the specific steps and menu names may vary depending on your computer’s make and model. If you are having trouble finding the hardware virtualization setting, try consulting your computer’s documentation or the manufacturer’s website for instructions.

Sometimes, the hardware virtualization setting can become corrupted or stuck in a certain state. Disabling and re-enabling it can reset the setting and potentially fix any issues you are experiencing. Of course, this is just one potential solution, and it may not work for everyone. If you have tried this step and are still having trouble, there may be other issues at play that you’ll need to address.

This problem occurs when I attempt to launch a “tiny core” virtual machine:

Oracle VM Virtual Box Version 7.0.4 r154605 (Qt5.15.2)

VM Name: TinyCore

Not in a hypervisor partition (HVP=0) (VERR_NEM_NOT_AVAILABLE).
VT-x is disabled in the BIOS for all CPU modes (VERR_VMX_MSR_ALL_VMX_DISABLED).
Result Code:
E_FAIL (0X80004005)
Component:
ConsoleWrap
Interface:
IConsole {6ac83d89-6ee7-4e33-8ae6-b257b2e81be8}

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